Mar. 16th, 2010

karmahoudini: (Bye-Bye Miss American Pie)
You:
Name: Kels
Contact: vaultedthewall @ LJ, exitmouse@gmail.com, riceballtohru on AIM

Character:
Deity Hero Witch's Name: Medea
Pantheon: Greek
Current Alias: Maria Pelas-Argos
Apparent Age: Mid Twenties
Occupation: Her 'day' job is a midnight shift ER nurse. On the side..."I do things for money." Fortune telling, racketeering, dealer at the occasional gambling establishment, ties to various organized crime.

Personality: In a word: Ruthless. Utterly, and completely ruthless. She'll do whatever it takes to achieve a goal once she has it set, and shows no outward signs of remorse for it. She has a strong sense of personal freedom and will not allow anyone to take it from her. Medea would rather burn all her bridges than have to pay the toll, as it were. The most she'll do is pay lip-service as long as she needs it to get where she's going, and only if there's no other way.

Obviously, being very goal-oriented, she easily comes across as very cold-hearted and tends to miss the trees for the forest.

This has not helped her when it comes to being painted as a villain - or rather, it has, because Medea would rather be considered a villain, a wicked woman, an irredeemable evil witch. She can't abide by pity, which sympathy always seems like. Blows and abuse I can take and give back again, tenderness I cannot bear. as the Man of La Mancha song goes. After all, 'in for a penny, in for a pound', right? Her name is already equated with the idea of killing your own children in psychology circles, when you're known for the most shameful moment in your life, you can't fall much father.

She has a hard time trusting people - you would too if you'd been through what she's been through. She's always waiting for the other shoe to drop, for the other party to betray her. This is why she so frequently betrays them first. The concept of trust and companionship without anything asked for in return is so utterly foreign to her.

The truth is, she DOES feel remorse and regret at her actions. It's fitting that she basically got away with everything when you consider that no amount of punishment in Tartarus would ever top the knowledge that her children died by her hand. She would rather die than anyone ever figure this out, though. She refuses to be a pitiful mewling damsel.

History: Okay let's get this clear right off the bat: Greek myth has complicated and contradictory genealogy. It happens when you let the fanfic become canon. To simplify things, Medea was the daughter of the king of Colchis - Aeetes (AKA he of too many vowels to make a name) - and Idyia. While some sources state that Hecate was Medea's mother, that appears to be in a strictly metaphorical sense. Medea was a priestess of the goddess (aka witch) and theoretically had a life that was going swimmingly before some idiot on a freaking boat that wasn't even that handsome at all really decided to dock in her city, but no one gives a damn about the ladyfolk so her story effectively starts when she gets upgraded to love interest to one Jason, prince on a quest.

See Jason was on this fool's errand to find the golden fleece. Totally an impossible task, placed upon him by this jerkass uncle of his known as Pelias. What Pelias didn't know upon giving Jason this quest was that as much as his nephew had curried favor with the gods, he himself had rather royally pissed them off, especially Hera. Protip: Do not piss off Hera, it never goes well. Hera, like she is wont to do, wanted some damn revenge in the good ole Greek way. And it just so happened that the heir of Slytherin Medea was a perfect instrument for revenge. The trick was getting her back to Iolcos where Pelias was ruling his stolen kingdom. Oh hey look, Jason just so happens to be in the area of Colchis, AND he could really use Medea's help, and he's always been so good to us in the past. Ordering Mister Worf Eros to fire all phasers shoot her with the love arrow, Medea was instantly smitten with Jason's rugged and manly good looks. She would later argue she just wanted to get off that rock and he had a beautiful boat.

Betraying her father, her homeland, basically everything previously held dear to her, Medea helped Jason get the Golden Fleece. Jason, seeing Medea's usefulness and rockin' body, totally accepted her help. There's conflicting stories about whether it was Medea that murdered her brother, or if it was Jason, but either way he ended up dead and at the most innocent each was an accessory to the other's crime. So with he help of magical arrows of love, Medea and Jason became the ancient world's version of Bonnie and Clyde.

While on the lamb from the pursuing forces Medea and Jason cut the body of her brother to pieces and tossed him overboard bit by bit, knowing her father would have to stop along the way to pick them up so that he could be buried properly.

Fleece? Ganked.

Pursuing forces? Thrown.

Heroes? Escaped.

Basically all of Jason's following quests on the way back to Iolcos can be described with "We came, we saw, we kicked it's ass!" Between Medea and Jason, there was nothing stopping the Argo or its crew. Returning to Iolcos didn't dampen their kill streak, either. It wasn't just enough to return triumphant and place Jason's father back on the throne. There was still the matter of that jerk Pelias needing to suffer for his transgression against Hera.

And suffer he did.

See, Medea had this little trick - retuning youth to people. She did so for Jason's father (completely disobeying the rules of alchemy and not taking something in return) and Pelias's daughters, upon seeing this, begged her to help their own aging father.

That's a bingo~

Medea demonstrated how it needed to be done using an old ram. She cut it up and threw it into a cauldron, added the magical herbs, and prest-o change-o, lamb jumps back out. BRILLIANT!

Only when Pelias's daughters cut up their father and tossed him into a pot, Medea kind of ~neglected~ the magic herbs. Oops! Funny how patricide can hit at the most unlikely times.

The downside about this situation for Medea and Jason was that as much as Pelias was a dick and his death was at the will of the gods, it was still murder because he was still a citizen, so they got a little sorta exiled. Didn't matter much though, right? There was always another quest, always more adventure, always more dreams to be chased full speed ahead. Even after having two children, only then did the two begin to slow down... And that's about when the gods must have realized how scary effective the two were together. Really, if Jason and Medea hadn't had a little marital problems the second Trojan War would have probably ended before it began with Medea finding a way to kill Helen, pin it on Agamemnon (or get him to actually do it and get caught) and put Jason in the man's place.

Pausing in Corinth, shit went south quick. Jason caught the eye of the princess Glauce. Jason was already a married man, but that didn't seem to matter. Unlike Medea, Glauce was unexiled and Greek by birth. Medea was considered a barbarian. Without marriage to Jason, her status - and that of their children - were barely more than slaves.

After trying and failing to reason with Jason, Medea did what comes best to her: Revenge. She sent Glauce a poisoned gown under the guise of a wedding gift, killing not just the girl but her father as well.

Unfortunately, as well as the plan worked, it was a crime of passion. Murdering the princess without the quick getaway of the Argo meant bad times ahead. She wasn't able to ensure that her children would escape safely. If the soldiers of Corinth got a hold of them first... Let's just say the Greeks had few qualms about killing children, brutally, when it seemed like the will of the gods. While she would never admit it, she truly believed that killing her children were the only way to save them from a worse fate - the fact that it would hurt Jason as well was an afterthought, and one she played to the hilt.

The last time she ever saw Jason in the ancient world was when he came to see the bodies of their slain children - only to have Medea whisk them away and tell him that he would never find where she was going to bury them.

And she would have gotten away with it too, if it weren't for you meddling k-

Oh, wait, actually, nevermind that. She did get away with it. All of it.

She summoned the chariot her grandfather Helios gave her, gave Jason the double deuce just so he knew she was serious, and flew away into the sky.

After that she skipped over to Thebes and chilled with Heracles for a while, was driven out and settled in Athens, marrying Theseus's father. Of course, things never turn out well as Theseus decided to return after Medea had already had a son with the King of Athens, so of course she tried to drive out the hero to preserve the status of herself and her son. That didn't work and she had to flee again - this time with child in tow and still alive.

After that the story gets fuzzy, some say she goes left while others say she goes right - if you ask her she'll say that they're all true.

Sadly, as much as she wants the man to suffer, her story is innately tied to that of Jason's. Where he goes, she goes too. Whether she wants to or not.

With the rise of neo-paganism she has gained a bit more of a solo identity - a bunch of fluffy pagans wanting to excuse or apologize her actions like because of Eros's love arrows she couldn't help but destroy the lives of others. She doesn't particularly like people acting like she couldn't control her own actions, but she accepts the belief where she can get it.

Along with her night and day jobs, Medea has managed to work her way into a 'coven' of fluffy neo-pagans that do about as much magic as a Sunday book club, but she's managed to teach them how to properly pay worship and make sacrifice. Usually the kind that involves burning material goods as opposed to killing puppies. Nothing puts the soccer moms off faster than puppy death. Of course she still worships her goddess Hecate, but after the debacle with Jason... Medea's got a soft spot in her heart for Hera as well. The scorned wife, giving everything only to have her husband toss the marriage aside for something younger and prettier. She now puts the great goddess alongside her traditional patron as well.

PB: Rosario Dawson

Image Link: the wrong mythological figure, but I couldn't resist the irony.

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Medea

May 2010

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